Tag Archives: indie

Flycam Flujo: Follow-Up & Summary

17 Jun

Apologies if this is a repeat of previous information, but some of it bears repeating.

The Flycam experiment has essentially ended, as I’ve taken it almost to its breaking point and back. More importantly, I just bought a new arm, so that kinda kills the all-Proaim-testing part of it. I will still have to have an adapter made in order to use that arm, but it’s a Glidecam, which I know works, so it’s not an unknown quantity necessarily.

Flycam Flujo ModdedSo how did the Flycam Flujo do? The maiden voyage (well, maiden series) saw it handling a C300 rig pretty regularly, including an unnecessarily heavy “low-mode cage” that damn near killed it. By the end of my run on the season, I had my transitions to and from Steadi down to five and two minutes, respectively, but that isn’t necessarily the Flujo’s doing. I used it effectively and without any equipment-related mishaps (several operator-related ones notwithstanding.) But there are a lot of things that need fixing.

The biggest problem with the entire system is the arm. At some point, probably eight months after buying it (and after about four months of constant usage,) the bearings in the arm started to break. Currently, one of them is completely gone–it must have fallen out on set, and I have no idea when that happened–and the one directly across has shattered. I currently have a steel bolt through the arm where the two bearings are missing, but it’s not the same thickness as the bearings were, and consequently throws off the angle of the first part of the arm pretty severely. Visual inspection reveals that there are several other bearings on the verge of breaking.Modded J-Box

The breaking bearings are probably a fault in the manufacturing, but the entire arm being twisted is not. It’s hard to tell, but the entire arm has torqued ever so slightly outwards, probably because it had a great deal of weight on it. The twist causes the sled to move forward, which makes the operator have to lean back, and down that road lie tears and pulled backs. Varying reports list different weight capacities for the rig, and while my setup was on the heavy end, I’m fairly certain that anyone putting anything on this that was smaller would have a bear of a time figuring out what to do with all that extra inertial energy in the arm. The single-point tension adjustments are very nice, but like many things on this rig, are cheap screws and begin to strip and get loose over time.

So the arm is a serious problem in the long run, even with the modifications I made. The different sizes of post actually helped a considerable amount, and I’m going to have to figure out a way to get that same flexibility in my new arm.

Marrying the HDMI and power with electrical tape.

Marrying the HDMI and power with electrical tape.

The vest is still atrocious, and the sled’s problems were well-documented at the beginning of this series, which is good because I no longer remember what they were. I’ve made quite a few adjustments to the sled, and am currently wiring a new post cable (specifically, HDMI-and-power-tied-together cable.)

But one thing that has absolutely worked is the idea of flexibility. I had the posts and socket-block adapter made so that, when the time came, I could swap an arm, sled, or vest without any other issues. The annoying note here is that I bought a used Glidecam V-25, which actually does have an issue, in that its connection to the vest is incorrect, and I’m having to have another adapter cut at a shop, but that’s only a minor thing. The bones of the system are solid enough to support something like what I’ve done, but it only worked because I have a serious background in this stuff, knew what I wanted, and had operating capital to get it.

All in all, I would not in the least recommend this rig to anyone. It’s been a great deal of trouble, and while it did land me a great job on an amazing set, it’s brought with it a great deal of stress and heartache as things that I shouldn’t have to worry about begin to fail or break.

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Camera “Cart”

13 Feb

I love the organization that I see big-time AC’s using–always seem to know where everything is, even in a huge Arri bag–and the carts are a big part of that. It’s great to say “go get X from the A-camera cart” and know exactly what and where it is, not having to rummage through cases or bags that are lumped in a trunk or a table somewhere.

But a Magliner runs $250ish, and the nose pieces, shelves, etc. all start adding up very quickly. You can buy a fully-rigged camera cart from Filmtools for a pretty penny, which I would love to have, but A) don’t have the capital for, B) don’t have a consistent need for, and C) don’t have room in my apartment for. So! Until the day comes when I have more money, more work, and a house, I will continue to find work-arounds.

Whilst flipping through channels the other week, my wife paused on QVC (or HSN? Can’t remember) and we saw the Origami shelf advertised. Of course, they show really stupid things to do with it on those shows–things that are semi-permanent, paired with a shelf being sold because it is temporary–but the wife said “hey, that’d be cool for your camera stuff.”

The next few minutes, I thought more and more about it–folds down pretty small, big enough to support weight…and yeah, it did seem like a cool thing. I started researching, and discovered multiple sizes. I ultimately decided on the R4-01 which seemed like it would be big enough to hold several cases, and wide enough to support my hi-hat (which I usually have setup on a cart with a tripod head, for building/staging the camera.)

After a snafu with shipping (meaning they said they delivered it, but they did not–Amazon very graciously sent me a replacement free of charge and with upgraded one-day shipping) the R4-01 showed up and was exactly what I was expecting. After almost breaking it to open it (the clip for the top shelf had hooked around one of the bars in the middle shelf, and I forced when I shouldn’t have–thankfulky, everything bent back into place pretty easily) I set it up in my living room and found it to be much taller than I thought. I’m a tall guy, and the top shelf sat comfortably at my stomach level. Adding my hi-hat to the top put the camera up near my chest, and let me build at a very comfortable height. The shelves were wide enough to hold my AC bags and camera case, and the bottom shelves were even long enough to mostly cover my Steadicam cases.

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I thought I would be cheap and buy my own wheels. Ultimately, I can’t speak to the quality of the casters from Amazon, and I don’t think I actually saved any money, but I built my own rolling platform to put the shelves on. I went with 2-1/2″ hard plastic casters from Home Depot–I wanted to get bigger wheels, perhaps even inflatables, but I was afraid (and rightfully so) that those would put the camera stage over my comfortable level.

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After a week-long industrial shoot, I am really pleased with the results. It easily fit all the cases, and I added a bag to the side to hold my personal items. I’d love to have some hooks or bottle/can holders, but we’ll see what develops. I will say, though, that we were inside, on-location and in-studio, and it was awesome. My wheels–nay, any wheels less-than-inflatables–would not do very well on any ground that is less than smooth. That being said, if you don’t mind carrying the shelves around (they’re not terribly heavy) then you could definitely get away with moving around on rough terrain, provided you weren’t moving a heck of a lot.

So! A little ingenuity and repurposing can get you a neat camera cart of your own. Until the Magliners are cheaper, that is.

Update: After a pretty big boost from The Black and Blue (thanks, Evan!) I realised that I needed to update the post with some in-the-field pictures.

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Here is that cart actually being multi-purpose for another DIY project…